Las Vegas Irrigation and Sprinkler Repair News and Information


How to Replace the Sprinkler Valve Solenoid

Your lawn’s sprinkler system is a crucial part of keeping your lawn beautiful and healthy. Throughout the growing season, if you notice your sprinkler system is missing spots on the lawn or the lawn does not look as healthy in a particular spot, a damaged or clogged sprinkler valve solenoid could be to blame. The sprinkler valve solenoid is the part of the sprinkler system that distributes the water to the lawn; when the solenoid becomes damaged, the water will back up in the pipes, unable to reach the lawn. It’s important to replace a damaged valve solenoid to ensure that your lawn stays beautiful and that more damage to your system does not occur.

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How to Repair Water Sprinkler Valves

You may begin to notice that your lawn sprinkler system is not producing the results it should be. This is most likely due to a damaged or clogged sprinkler valve. Damage can occur to sprinkler valves by accidentally hitting it with a lawn mower or other objects. In order to keep your sprinkler system running at full capacity and efficiency, inspect, replace and clean sprinkler valves regularly.

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How to Clean Inground Sprinkler Heads

Inground sprinkler systems are a great way to keep lawns and gardens efficiently watered. Although these systems are useful, over time inground sprinkler heads can become dirty or clogged. Yearly cleaning of inground sprinkler heads is important for keeping your watering system at peak performance. Read on to learn more.

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How to Clean Pop-Up Sprinkler Heads

Despite the convenience of pop-up sprinklers, the heads can accumulate a buildup of dirt and grime over time, which can cause them to stop functioning like they once did. A thorough cleaning of your pop-up sprinkler heads, whether they are metal or plastic, can help bring them back to full working order. Periodic and routine cleaning of your sprinkler heads will also help ensure their longevity. Pop-up sprinkler heads often need to be cleaned after sitting idle and being covered with the leaves, debris and snow of fall and winter.

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Types of Pop-Up Sprinkler Heads

Sprinkler systems help maintain lawns, keeping them green and healthy. Pop-up sprinklers are preferable to systems that use risers, a type of above-ground sprinkler. The different pop-up sprinkler heads change the way your lawn is watered and how much water pressure you need to operate the system without incident.

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The Best Way to Cut Around a Pop-up Sprinkler

Pop-up sprinklers have internal spring mechanisms that move nozzles above grass for watering and retract into the ground afterward. Along with hiding sprinkler heads, using pop-up sprinklers prevents sprinkler heads from becoming accidental tripping hazards and reduces damage to them from lawnmowers and other power tools. A pop-up sprinkler that does not retract completely into the ground, however, requires the use of a specific tool to cut grass blades around it.

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How to Unclog a Pop-Up Sprinkler Head

Automatic sprinkler systems are useful for keeping your lawn watered without much work required from you. Most systems rely on sprinkler heads that are hidden in the lawn; water pressure causes them to pop up when they are in use, ensuring that the lawn is getting watered evenly. Pop-up sprinkler heads can easily become clogged with dirt and debris, though, which will negatively affect the water distribution. Unclogging pop-up sprinkler heads helps to keep your system performing optimally.

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How to Use Stone to Hide a Sprinkler System

A sprinkler system takes the hassle out of watering lawns and gardens. The system's sprinkler heads can be eyesores, however, and you may choose to cover them with natural-looking stones when the sprinkler heads are not in use. If you have a sprinkler system that you never use or that no longer works, then using stones to hide its sprinkler heads.is an alternative to digging up the entire system. Sprinkler heads can be hidden by stones in a few ways.

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How to Replace Sprinkler Heads

If you have an irrigation system, it is likely that you have experienced the wasteful geyser of water caused by a blown sprinkler head. Or sometimes the heads simply clog up and refuse to work. Either way, it is really an easy job to change out the average sprinkler head. Here's how.

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How to Replace Toro Sprinkler Heads

Toro sprinklers help keep lawns and gardens beautiful by satisfying water requirements. They accomplish this task using pop-up and gear-driven sprinkler models. A Toro sprinkler head may need to be replaced due to age or damage caused by contact with lawn equipment and other elements. Replacing your Toro sprinkler ensures your lawn and garden areas do not dry out and wither. Replacement includes removing your old Toro sprinkler head and threading a new one onto the underground riser pipe. You can make adjustments to the sprinkler's radius and arc using adjustment screws.

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How to Adjust a Rainbird Rotary Sprinkler Head

Rainbird rotary sprinkler heads use gear-driven mechanisms to irrigate defined areas in lawns and gardens. The design of the Rainbird rotary sprinkler allows the pop-up section in the center of the unit to turn to the far left, setting a starting point for the sprinkler. An adjustable arc dial on top of the sprinkler allows you to set the angle of the spray arc. Properly set, a Rainbird sprinkler will cover only the defined area and avoid spraying on areas such as walks, driveways, buildings and patios. Adjusting a Rainbird sprinkler takes only a few minutes.

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How to Change the Setting on Rainbird Sprinkler Systems

Rain Bird sprinkler systems are a very common brand when it comes to sprinklers. Rain Bird Corporation manufactures several models of sprinkler heads and systems. Rain Bird sprinkler systems come equipped with adjustable settings and an automatic timer, so your lawn will get watered even if you are not home or are asleep. Some adjustments for automatic settings include setting the timer to control the time that the sprinklers will turn on, and how long each section of sprinklers will run.

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Recommended Sprinkler Duration Times

Several factors apply when determining how long to leave the sprinkler on when watering. These factors include the time of day, how much water your sprinkler emits, the type of soil and grass and the air temperature. Do not allow water to puddle, or run off the landscape when watering. Puddles and run-off indicate that the soil is not absorbing the water as quickly as it is applied. Adjust the duration and number of daily watering cycles to provide the proper amount of water without puddles and run-off.

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How Long to Run the Sprinkler on a Lawn?

Using a sprinkler to water a lawn is quite common. However, the length of time spent watering will differ, depending on your grass type and sprinkler. A few basic steps will help you solve this puzzle.

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How Often Should You Water Your Lawn?

A lush, green lawn gives you a sense of pride and boosts your home's curb appeal. Grass needs enough water to grow properly and stay green, but the timing and method of irrigation is also a factor in how well your lawn grows. The average lawn does well on about 1 inch of water each week. That includes both rain and any extra irrigation you do to keep your lawn green.

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How Long Do You Leave Drip Irrigation On?

Drip irrigation is a method of watering all types of plants that conserves water, saves money on your water bill and delivers water only to the plants' root zones, where it is needed most. You can create a complicated, extensive drip system or keep it simple by purchasing a kit that includes all the hoses, emitters and other components you'll need. If you install a timer, you'll save even more time.

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How to Make Your Own Passive Drip Irrigation System

With today’s water restrictions, it has become increasingly difficult to deliver an adequate amount of water to outdoor gardens. Drip irrigation is a great solution. Made from flexible vinyl or polyethylene pipe, drip systems are usually installed just below the ground's surface, or beneath ground cover such as mulch or stone. Because the water delivery is direct and targeted to the plant’s roots, the evaporation rate is nominal.

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How to Build Drip or Trickle Irrigation

Installing a trickle or drip irrigation system lowers your water use while improving your landscape. Drip irrigation works at ground level, delivering water to the plant's roots where all absorption takes place. There are many fittings for use on a drip system ranging from simple porous tubing allowing water to seep into the ground to microsprinklers that direct water over a small, targeted area. Combining these methods enables you to create the perfect irrigation system for your particular landscape.

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Garden Hoses That Trickle Water

Plants are 75 to 90 percent water, so soils clearly need adequate moisture for healthy crops. But when you irrigate you're not actually watering plants. You are "depositing" water into the soil's water bank so individual plants can "make withdrawals" as needed. Using trickle or drip irrigation systems allows you to deposit water much more efficiently, by more frequently applying smaller amounts. Trickle and soaker hose options offer the benefits of drip irrigation systems with much greater portability.

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What Are Drip Irrigators?

Drip irrigation, also known as micro irrigation or trickle irrigation, is a system used to water crops or gardens in areas around the world that experience limited water availability. Drip irrigation allows gardeners to increase productivity while lowering the overall amount of water used in the irrigation process.

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The Advantage of a Trickle System

A trickle irrigation system is also known as drip irrigation or micro-irrigation. This type of irrigation system is designed to provide plants with adequate amounts of water, while using less water than traditional sprinkler systems. When properly designed and installed, trickle irrigation systems save water and are easy to maintain.

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Slow Drip Plant Watering System

Slow drip irrigation, also known as micro-irrigation, uses a network of pipes or tubes with tiny perforations to gradually and evenly provide water throughout a garden or yard. Among the advantages of a slow drip irrigation system, its efficient delivery of water makes it possible to use less water to satisfactorily irrigate the same number of plants. Over time, the savings in water consumption may outweigh any initial costs of installation.

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How to Make a Slow Drip Irrigation System

Drip irrigation has evolved from its origins in 1950s Israel to become an effective, low-cost watering method available to everyone. Drip systems use inexpensive polybutylene tubing and plastic microemitters to deliver water to roots, where it is needed most, avoiding the inefficiency of overspray characteristic of sprinklers. Drip systems don't have to be buried, and it is an uncomplicated procedure to install one yourself, as long as you have an accessible hose bib or outdoor water faucet. If you irrigate with drinking water, you'll have to protect it with a back flow preventer.

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How to Make an Irrigation System for a Vegetable Garden

Possibly the easiest, quickest and cheapest way for someone to make an irrigation system for a home vegetable garden is to use a seeping, or slow drip hose. Usually found in coils of 50 feet for about $10, the drip hose adds water directly to the soil without wasting it by spraying into the air or on leaves that don't absorb, which can sometimes lead to sunburn or disease. Be sure to water early in the mornings to give your vegetable plants ample time to absorb the water through their roots before the sun goes down, which also helps reduce the chance of disease.

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How to Install an Above Ground Sprinkler System

The piping for a lawn sprinkler system is always going to be below grade. Having all the piping on top of your lawn at all times is not practical and probably not allowed by your local laws. However, the sprinkler heads for the system can be above the ground. This will make the process of cutting the grass around the sprinkler heads a little more challenging, but it actually can make the installation process for the sprinkler system a little easier to deal with.

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Alternatives to Inground Sprinkler Systems

In-ground sprinkler systems are commonly used in yards, parks and other recreational areas to water grass and plants. Most have pop-up sprinkler heads that spray water over a designated area. There are many viable alternatives to in-ground sprinklers. Watering devices that are not rooted in-ground are useful to prevent pipe problems underground, prevent digging up a yard for installation, prevent electronic malfunctions and a variety of other things.

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Types of Inground Sprinkler Heads

If you are tired of moving the lawn sprinkler all over the yard, an in-ground sprinkler system may be the way to go. When choosing a sprinkler system, there are a few different sprinkler head options to consider. Each option provides a different way to water your yard. The layout of your yard, how you want it sprayed and how large the lawn is will determine which sprinkler head you should choose.

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How To Design a Home In-Ground Sprinkler System

A home in-ground sprinkler system is a useful addition to your lawn. It reduces time during irrigation, prevents waste and reduces chances of root rot. The system consists of underground PVC pipes connected to sprinkler heads. The heads spray a controlled flow of water into your yard, ensuring efficient and effective irrigation. Design the sprinkler pipes and the locations for the sprayer heads before digging the trenches. Make all necessary changes in the system’s layout and explore all irrigation possibilities before doing the physical work.

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How to Trench a Sprinkler System

Lawn sprinkler systems deliver water to your grass through underground irrigation pipes. These pipes are installed in trenches that you can dig in your lawn with a shovel and pick. When you purchase a sprinkler system, the manufacturer provides a design template to help you map out where the irrigation pipes and sprinkler heads should be located. The manufacturer also will provide useful facts about your climate and lawn.

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How to Use a Sprinkler Pipe Puller

Sprinkler systems rely on plastic pipes to run water from a main irrigation manifold to individual sprinklers. Sometimes, it becomes necessary to remove the pipes that connect the main line to the sprinklers. These are called pipe nipples, and can be very difficult to remove when they break or crack. There is a tool, called a nipple extractor, which can make the task of removing a sprinkler pipe much easier and safer.

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How to Install a Torro Lawn Sprinkler System

A Toro sprinkler system is buried underground and pops up to water the lawn when activated by hand or a controller. Some Toro sprinklers rotate up to 360 degrees, while other models are stationary and pop up to spray only in the direction in which it was installed. The sprinkler system is controlled by water valves that stem from the irrigation line. Before you install your system, draw up a plan of where you want to install Toro sprinklers and pipes.

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How to Dig a Sprinkler System

The major components of an irrigation system, including the pipes, irrigation wire, valves and sprinklers, are installed underground. Trenching is an important part of the installation process. Trenches are holes in the ground where you insert and bury the water lines and sprinklers. Following installation, you'll cover the holes to give the appearance that the system isn’t even there. While you can certainly dig trenches by hand, digging might be easier and faster with the assistance of a trenching machine, which you can rent from the local gardening store.

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What Is Average Depth of a Residential Sprinkler System?

Residential sprinkler systems require the supply lines that carry water to the sprinkler heads to be installed underground. The subsurface installation insulates pipes and helps prevent damage from frozen pipes. There is no standard depth for sprinkler lines, given the wide variety of terrain and uses. Deciding how deep to dig the trenches for your sprinkler lines requires consideration of several factors, including the sizes of various components that make up the underground system.

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How to Drain a Residential Sprinkler System

A residential sprinkler system begins at the irrigation water line, which extends from the main water line of the home. During cold weather, it's necessary to drain the irrigation line to prevent cracks and breaks. Some systems require you to blow out the sprinkler system with an air compressor following drainage, which can be completed by a licensed professional. When temperatures start to drop, follow a few steps to properly drain your system.

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How to Drain an Inground Sprinkler System

Almost all irrigation systems, for commercial or residential applications, contain a built-in drain valve. This valve is typically located on the sprinkler manifold, which controls the flow of water to individual zones. This drain valve allows users to literally pull the plug on the system, and for the water to drain from the manifold and the vacuum breaker. These two parts are the most susceptible to breakage, so it's important to drain them at the end of every watering season.

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How to Drain a Lawn Sprinkler System

A lawn sprinkler system connects to an outdoor water valve or wall faucet to irrigate the yard. Draining the system before the arrival of winter weather prevents freezing lines that could crack or burst. Gravity will eventually drain the water from the sprinkler system, depending on your landscaping, but a faster, surefire way to empty the sprinkler lines is to hook up an air compressor. Use an adapter from a hardware store or garden center to connect the compressor hose to your water line.

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How to Turn on a Rainbird Sprinkler System

A Rain Bird controller tells the valves of a sprinkler system when to open and close. This allows you to control when and for how long your lawn receives water. Many types of fertilizer or pesticides require you to water your lawn after application. Waiting until your sprinkler system's scheduled start time to apply water to your lawn can cause the applied chemical to kill your grass. Fortunately, Rain Bird controllers allow you to apply water to your lawn without changing set watering times.

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How to Replace a Battery in a Rainbird Sprinkler System

Rainbird sprinkler systems use timers to control sprinkler operation. The timers manage when sprinklers turn on with programming schedules. The schedules are stored in the timer's memory so you don't have to keep programming the timer. Batteries supply the power to the sprinkler timer for storing programming information. On some models, they allow the sprinkler to be used remotely or without regular household electricity. Replacing your Rainbird sprinkler system's battery requires accessing the battery compartment, removing the old batteries and replacing them with the exact same type.

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How to Replace a Sprinkler Controller

Your home sprinkler system contains a sprinkler control valve that determines how much water passes through the sprinkler system. If you're having any problems with controlling the amount of water coming through your system, it may be time to replace the controller valve. It's an easy job to replace the sprinkler controller, once you know where your current control valve is. Most above-ground sprinkler systems use controllers.

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How to set your irrigation clock

For the average homeowner, outdoor watering accounts for as much as 70 to 90 percent of water used each month. All that water is managed by one tool that’s counting on you to set it correctly: your irrigation clock. Learn how to set your irrigation clock to help you water efficiently outdoors.

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Spring Watering Restrictions

Mandatory watering restrictions limit landscape irrigation to three assigned days per week from March 1 through April 30. Watering restrictions also apply to drip irrigation. Sunday is not an optional watering day.

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Consumptive Use

Water used outdoors falls under the consumptive use category because it is often lost to evaporation. While nearly all water used indoors can be recycled, water used outside often can't because of evaporation. This also is known as "consumptive use." Consumptive use is the water that is actually consumed and not returned to the immediate water environment. It's the portion of water that evaporates, is used in products or crops or is consumed by people or livestock.

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Types of Sprinkler Valves

A sprinkler system is dependent upon its system of valves as well as your ability to provide the proper layout and installation of those valves and pipes. As you are installing any of the valves that make up your sprinkler system, take an extra moment or two just to make sure that you are not installing the valve incorrectly. Water that isn't flowing in the right direction will make even the most expensive sprinkler system temporarily worthless.

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How to Clean Out Sprinkler Valves

A lawn sprinkler system is an important addition to any yard because it maintains a healthy evenly-green lawn with a minimum of work. Over time, however, due to dirt and debris clogging the sprinkler system, the sprinkler valves may need to be taken apart and cleaned

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How to Replace an Anti-Flowback Valve Sprinkler

An anti-flowback valve prevents the water in the sprinkler system's pipes from contaminating the building's potable water. If the building suffers a pressure loss in its potable water pipes, the negative pressure in the building's water pipes closes the anti-flowback valve. The anti-flowback valve connects to the sprinkler system between the building's irrigation system water shut-off valve and the first sprinkler head. Sprinkler systems connected to an irrigation-only water supply, such as a single-use well pump, usually do not use an anti-flowback valve. Always replace a sprinkler system's original anti-flowback valve with a compatible model.

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How to Replace the Diaphragm in a Sprinkler Valve

A rubber diaphragm is at the heart of all automatic irrigation valves. The valves open by creating a pressure differential on the two sides of the diaphragm and close by equalizing that pressure. A tear in the diaphragm will result in sprinklers that never shut off completely. While a wide range of designs exists for these valves among the various manufacturers, the process of replacing a diaphragm is universal.

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How to Replace an Irrigation Valve

Irrigation valves in your sprinkler system usually last a long time and do not need repair often. If the valve fails, it will usually do so at the solenoid, diaphragm or the ports. All of these parts are located in the top portion of the valve. In most cases, the cheapest and quickest way to replace the valve is to buy the same valve and replace the top portion by unscrewing the top of the old valve and replacing it with the new top. In extreme cases, the valve might need to be cut out.

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How To Turn Off a Sprinkler Solenoid Valve

Irrigation valve companies manufacture solenoid valves to operate automatically from a controller. The valve has two wires coming into it that operate a solenoid. The solenoid controls the diaphragm of the valve, causing it to open and shut at a preprogrammed time. Solenoids do fail, causing them to remain in the open position, when debris clogs the inner workings or if the solenoid, itself, fails.

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How to Turn Off the Water to a Sprinkler System

The way to shut off the water to a sprinkler system varies according to the type of valve that controls the system. There are generally two types of sprinkler system valves: hand operated manual valves and electronically operated automatic valves. Both types of valves are easy to use and, once you learn how they function, you have complete control over your irrigation system's water supply.

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How to Keep the Sprinkler Pipes in a Yard From Bursting

When sprinkler pipes burst, it's usually because water inside them was allowed to freeze. As water freezes, it expands and creates pressure on the outer walls of the pipe. This pressure can cause a pipe to burst, leading to leaks in the system and floods in your lawn. The best way to avoid this type of damage is to drain your pipes. Eliminating as much water as possible from the pipes each cupidsarrow before the first freeze of the season will help keep your system safe during the winter.

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How to Flush Out a Sprinkler System for Freezing Temps

Most sprinkler systems are not buried deep enough to protect them from freezing. Since water expands as it freezes, draining the system before cold weather strikes ensures that the pipes won’t burst. Draining a little water may not be enough to prevent pipe rupture. Flush all the water from the system to avoid damaging pipes and fixtures. The method you use for flushing the system depends on they type of drain the installers included when they built your system.

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How to Install a Sprinkler Head Reducer

Many sprinklers for commercial and residential use are set at the factory to accept a sprinkler riser that is 3/4 inches in diameter. But some models of sprinklers accept only a 1/2-inch riser. There is no major difference between the two types of sprinklers, except that the 3/4-inch models allow slightly more water to flow through at any given time. This will not, however, have a major effect on your lawn. It's simple to reduce the riser fitting to accept a 1/2-inch sprinkler head instead.

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How to Connect a Drip to Sprinkler Pipes

Drip irrigation lines use less water because they put the water directly where the plants need it -- at the roots. Drip irrigation lines can be easily added to a sprinkler system using a drip retrofit kit. These kits attach to sprinkler risers and come with built-in pressure regulators that reduce the water pressure to acceptable levels for drip lines. Drip irrigation kits are available in single or multiple lines, so you can use one sprinkler head to run drip lines for up to 12 plants at a time.

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Winter Watering Restrictions

Mandatory watering restrictions limit landscape irrigation to one assigned day per week from Nov. 1 through Feb. 28.

Watering restrictions also apply to drip irrigation. Sunday is not an optional watering day.

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How to Change Sprinkler Heads to Drip Irrigation

Water restrictions, increasing water costs and water conservation awareness can provide the motivation to change landscape spray irrigation sprinkler heads to drip irrigation systems. Changing to drip irrigation lets you put water where it's needed rather than watering an entire area and helps prevent weeds. Watering a plant's root system rather than the leaves can also help prevent fungus. Some water districts may even allow drip irrigation without restrictions. Although there are many types of sprinkler heads, the risers that attach the heads all have the same basic threaded fittings.

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How to Convert Sprinkler Systems to Drip Irrigation

Drip irrigation systems are becoming more popular than sprinkler systems because they use less water and do not wet the plant's leaves, which can sometimes encourage plant diseases. If you already have a sprinkler system, it's easy to convert it to a drip irrigation system. You use the supply lines that are already in place and replace some of the sprinkler heads with drip irrigation supply heads.

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How to Flush Out a Drip Irrigation System

Drip irrigation systems require little maintenance, but you do need to flush the system periodically to get rid of any dirt or other particles that get into the system. Many systems run off pressurized irrigation which is not filtered water, and accumulating dirt in the line can cause drip lines to stop watering plants. Even water that comes out of the garden hose from the house has sediment which accumulates in the lines after several months.

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How to Clean Drip Irrigation Filters

Drip irrigation systems are excellent for providing efficient watering of your plants, lawn and garden. Drip irrigation is the most effective watering system available, capable of delivering more than 90-percent efficiency. But drip irrigation systems require regular maintenance, particularly cleaning the filter, which can become clogged with dirt, sediment and mineral buildup. The filter is typically a canister-shaped component with a disc-like apparatus or mesh screen. Signs of a clogged filter that needs cleaning include uneven water flow and frequently clogged drip emitters.

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How to Install a Water System Over a Raised Garden

Drip irrigation systems are considered ideal for watering raised gardens. This is because the water doesn't get the leaves wet and helps reduce the possibility of disease and plant damage. Drip system lines are suspended on risers above the soil level, and emitters flow water to the plants. There are three basic parts to a drip system, the head unit, the transmission system and the emitters. Emitters can be nozzles placed in solid lines, or they can be the pin holes in a soaker hose.

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How to Water Roses With Drip Irrigation

Drip irrigation provides a slow flow of water at the base of the rose plant. Drip irrigation conserves water and is easy to use. Install the drip irrigation system at the beginning of the year and simply connect it to the hose, as needed, to water the roses.

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How to Design a Garden Water Sprinkler System

An automatic sprinkler system is a major investment for your landscape, but makes it much easier to make sure that every plant gets the water that it requires. The first step in achieving this objective is to produce a carefully designed plan for the layout of the sprinkler system. Pay special attention to the measurements of the proposed watering area, the topography of your lot, the plantings in the landscape and even the different climates on the sunny and shady sides of the house.

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How to Install Garden Sprinklers

When it comes to a nice flower bed or a vegetable garden, most gardeners want a convenient way to water that doesn't involve standing outside holding a watering can or hose every day. Luckily, you can install garden sprinklers for very little cost or effort. There are elaborate systems out there, mostly used for lawns, which require you to dig underground. Those tasks, however, are best left to professionals. If you want to install garden sprinklers easily, all you need are a few hoses and sprinkler heads.

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How to Install Garden Drip Irrigation

Garden irrigation can be expensive if you use a traditional sprinkler system. If you live in an area with water restrictions and still want to keep flowerbeds looking good during the hot summer months, a drip-irrigation system may be the solution to your problem. Drip irrigation takes less water than traditional sprinkler systems. Because the water settles closer to the base of the plants, more of it soaks into the ground where it can benefit the plant's root system. A drip-irrigation system is easy to operate from an outdoor water faucet.

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How to Make a Slow Drip Irrigation System

Drip irrigation has evolved from its origins in 1950s Israel to become an effective, low-cost watering method available to everyone. Drip systems use inexpensive polybutylene tubing and plastic microemitters to deliver water to roots, where it is needed most, avoiding the inefficiency of overspray characteristic of sprinklers.

Read more on www.ehow.com

How To Install a Vacuum Breaker

A pressure vacuum breaker is an important part of any irrigation system and is required by most cities because it prevents contamination of the potable water supply through the irrigation system. If you have an irrigation system you should have a pressure vacuum breaker. You can call the local building code office to find out if it is required. Even if it is not required in your area it may be a good idea to install one. Learn how to install a vacuum breaker yourself to save on the cost of installation.

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Pressure Vacuum Breaker Basics

A pressure vacuum breaker is an important component of irrigation systems. What a pressure vacuum breaker does is to provide protection against backflow or back siphoning of water. This irrigation component keeps non-potable water from inadvertently entering the water supply through outlets of the irrigation system.

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Replace A Stop And Waste Valve

A stop and waste valve is a key irrigation fitting to help keep sprinkler lines from freezing in the winter. Many people have an automatic stop and waste valve as the main water shut off valve for their sprinkler system. The stop and waste valve is turned on and off with a meter key and when it is in the off position it will automatically drain any water in the line.

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Irrigation Troubleshooting - Bad Valve Symptoms

When troubleshooting an irrigation system it is important to know the various bad valve symptoms that can cause sprinkler problems. When a sprinkler valve is not working properly the effects can vary widely. A sprinkler valve has many components that can break or malfunction. To complicate matters a bad valve doesn’t always behave the same way. Bad valve symptoms can appear to be a broken sprinkler head or household water pressure problems.

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Hard Water is More Obvious During the Summer

The summer often means more water usage and more obvious hard water deposits if you happen to have hard water. The buildup around outdoor faucets can accumulate quickly when you water the yard more often. Irrigation components can become clogged up with calcium deposits. Patio misters can become blocked by the build up. Also, if you have an evaporative cooler the buildup can be quite obvious on the inside and outside of the unit as well as on the cooler pads.

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How To Use A Compression Coupling

A compression repair coupling is one option for repairing a broken sprinkler water line. Using a compression coupling doesn’t require measuring, gluing, or any additional space.

Note: compression couplings cannot withstand pulling, pushing, or sideways pressure. They are great to use in the ground where they don’t have to support the weight of the PVC pipe full of water.

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Lawn Care Watering Tips

Knowing when your lawn needs water and how much water it needs goes a long way toward keeping the lawn healthy and conserving natural resources. Proper lawn care, including techniques such as dethatching and aerating, helps your grass make the most of the water it receives and prevents waste.

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Common Mistake When Replacing an Irrigation Vacuum Breaker

If it becomes necessary to replace the pressure vacuum breaker for your irrigation system be sure to keep the minimum height requirement in mind. It may not seem like a big deal to simply cut out the old valve and install the new one in its place but losing a couple of inches in the process affect the function of the new vacuum breaker.

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Is Your Drip Irrigation Saving or Wasting Water?

Since one of the main reasons for and benefits of installing drip irrigation is the water savings it's a good idea to keep an eye out for leaks and puddles. Excess water is a clear sign of either a leak or over watering.

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Irrigation Troubleshooting - Bad Valve Symptoms

When troubleshooting an irrigation system it is important to know the various bad valve symptoms that can cause sprinkler problems. When a sprinkler valve is not working properly the effects can vary widely. A sprinkler valve has many components that can break or malfunction. To complicate matters a bad valve doesn’t always behave the same way. Bad valve symptoms can appear to be a broken sprinkler head or household water pressure problems.

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Low Water Pressure To Sprinklers - Check The Valves

Have you suddenly noticed a drop in sprinkler water pressure? Low pressure to sprinklers can be caused by generalized low water pressure but it can also be a symptom of a bad sprinkler valve. Before you start digging up sprinkler lines and buying a replacement sprinkler valve test the water pressure with a pressure gauge.

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Using Rain Sensors in Home Automation Systems

Most rain sensors are designed to shut off sprinkler and irrigation systems when water buildup is detected. The sensors do this by measuring when a set amount of raincupidsarrow has accumulated in the sensor. Although this may work fine for turning off a sprinkler system, it is hardly notification that the rain has just started.

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How Much Water Does Grass Need?

Unfortunately, there is no hard-and-fast answer to this question. It's one of those it depends kind of answers. You know, “It depends on the soil; it depends on the sunshine levels; it depends on where you live.” A good rule of thumb though is that turf requires between 1 and 11 inches of water a week to thrive. It doesn't matter whether the water comes from irrigation or natural raincupidsarrow—or a combination of both. Let's look at a few key concepts to understand watering and what you can do to improve your turf.

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Summertime Lawn Care Blues - Drought

There is a serious water shortage in many parts of North America and improperly growing and maintaining a home lawn can be huge burden on the water supply. In many cases, lawns are being scapegoated as water-hogging sponges that do nothing but pollute the environment and waste valuable water resources. While this may hold some accuracy, it does not have to be that way. A properly managed lawn, made up of the appropriate grass species and balanced soil, can be functional and use little or no supplemental water.

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How does water quality affect lawns?

Usually water quality is never an issue. If it's potable (drinkable), it's good enough to grow grass with. Not everyone can, or wants to, water the lawn with potable (metered) water though. Water shortages and plain old good water stewardship has changed the way we look at how grass is watered. Gray or effluent water, lake water, and other recycled water are viable sources and can have an effect on water quality and in turn affect the quality of the lawn.

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Smoky blue lawn shows need for water

Lawn questions seem to be on people’s minds along with some other questions.

Q: Why is my lawn turning smoky blue?

A: It needs water. Another indication of dryness is walking across the lawn; if your footprints remain visible in the turf, irrigate. For a quicker rewetting of the soil, place a tablespoon of detergent in a gallon of water and drench the area and then give your lawn a thorough watering.

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Guide To Sprinkler Valve Repair

An automatic sprinkler system is a great way to keep your yard looking great when all of the parts of working properly. Just one broken sprinkler valve can take a toll on your landscaping. Taking care of a sprinkler valve repair at the first signs of trouble can minimize the damage.

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Fine Tuning Your Sprinkler System to More Effectively Water the Lawn

Having a sprinkler system to water the lawn is an opportunity to supplement natural raincupidsarrow, not an excuse to water the lawn excessively. When a sprinkler system is installed properly and used correctly, it can be an efficient way to water the lawn and save money in the long run. The problem with many irrigation systems is that they are not used properly, out of adjustment, or not up to date.

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Spring Lawn Care Tips - Starting a Sprinkler System

Watering is one of the main elements of maintaining a lawn. For lawns maintained at a moderate to high level, or lawns where water is at a premium, an automatic sprinkler system is the best way to deliver precise amounts of water to specific areas.

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Spring Lawn Care Tips - Spring Weed Control

Timing is everything when it comes to spring weed control. Normally, the blooming of forsythia will approximate the time of crabgrass germination and provide a window of several weeks to apply pre-emergent herbicide.

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Spring Lawn Care Tips - Dethatching

One of the first things you can do for a lawn in the spring is thatch control. Thinning out the thatch in the spring clears out old, dead grass and other organic matter that has built up over time but has not broken down.

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Spring Lawn Care Tips - Spring Cleaning

When spring is finally in the air and the temperatures finally lift. When you're able to get outside and work, there are spring lawn care routines that can be done to ensure a healthy lawn all season long.

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How to Manage Lawn in a Drought

There is a serious water shortage in many parts of America and improperly growing and maintaining a home lawn can be huge burden on the water supply. In many cases, lawns are being scapegoated as water-hogging sponges that do nothing but pollute the environment and waste valuable water resources. While this may hold some accuracy, it does not have to be that way. A properly managed lawn, made up of the appropriate grass species and balanced soil, can be functional and use little or no supplemental water.

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How to Start Up an Irrigation System

Watering is one of the main elements of maintaining a lawn. For lawns maintained at a moderate to high level, or lawns where water is at a premium, an automatic sprinkler system is the best way to deliver precise amounts of water to specific areas.

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Installing a Sprinkler System

A sprinkler system may seem like an extravagant touch to maintaining a lawn but in many parts of the country they are as common as lawn mowers, and in fact are an excellent way to manage and conserve water when used properly. While it is possible to install a system as a DIY project, it is most effectively done by licensed professionals and in some cases required. The proper selection and placement of sprinkler heads, pump sizing, and installing the piping and spray heads are all jobs that are best left to the experts.

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Automated Sprinkler Systems

Automated sprinkler systems are a great way of watering gardens and yards. This convenient system allows you to control one or many sprinkler heads in a row, called a zone. The system comes with a watering brain box called an automated sprinkler controller. The box sports an incoming water connection (hose adapter) that feeds the system with water. It also has outgoing ports that feed each zone of sprinkler heads through devices called remote-controlled sprinkler valves.

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The Basics of Watering Lawns

Watering the lawn is much more than running sprinklers at night or spraying it with a hose. Water management is an integral component of a sound lawn care program. As water increasingly becomes a scarce resource, conservation and lawn management play a more important role in a lawn care program.

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Is sprinkler system worth it?

The value of an automatic sprinkler system is relative to the intensity of maintenance and aesthetics desired. If you already manually water your lawn regularly and you desire a moderate to highly manicured lawn, it could be worth it. Sprinkler systems save, time, money, aid in water conservation, and help achieve a lush, green lawn.

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Drip Irrigation Systems and Water Conservation

The location of the open holes is tailored so as to irrigate most efficiently the specific garden beds in which drip irrigation systems will be buried, promoting water conservation. If you have a bed in which perennials are spaced at two-foot intervals, then there will be corresponding holes in the tubing at two-foot intervals, through which water will be discharged.

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The Basics of Watering Lawns

Watering the lawn is much more than running sprinklers at night or spraying it with a hose. Water management is an integral component of a sound lawn care program. As water increasingly becomes a scarce resource, conservation and lawn management play a more important role in a lawn care program.

The water requirements of a lawn can vary depending on grass species, soil texture, climate and desired level of aesthetics and maintenance. Turf generally needs about one inch of water a week during the growing season to stay green and actively growing.

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Using Lawn Sprinklers

Recharging an irrigation system can begin as soon as the frost is no longer in the ground or when you can get a shovel easily down a full 12 inches.

Every irrigation system is different but they are all installed with the same basic principles. Here are some simple tips for starting up the system for the first time in the spring.

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What's the difference between "spray" lawn sprinkler heads and "rotor" heads?

Spray lawn sprinkler heads are sometimes designed to pop up out of the ground when the sprinkler system is activated, while others rest on pipes that remain aboveground at all times. Spray heads discharge a large volume of water in a relatively short amount of time, giving them, in irrigation lingo, a “high application rate.” For this reason, sprinkler systems with spray heads are most suitable for even surfaces, not slopes.

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What are the pros and cons of automatic irrigation systems?

Automatic irrigation systems are convenient, especially for those who travel. About the only con one can list for them is that, initially, they cost more than the alternative. But if installed and programmed properly, they can even save you money in the long run and help in water conservation. Dead lawn grass and plants need to be replaced, and that can be expensive.

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Pasture Drip Systems Installation

Although much research remains to do, subsurface drip (SSD) irrigation is becoming a viable alternative to surface-based systems such as sprinklers. Dairy farmers must deal with scarcities, environmental regulation and trade imbalances, all of which make input resources more precious. Providing adequate water for grazing pasture is a constant concern when climate is dry.

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How to Set Up a Garden Drip System

Drip irrigation uses hoses perforated with small holes to slowly drip water into the garden. Hoses are placed around each plant, soaking the soil near the plant. Drip systems use less water that sprinkler systems because loss of water in the air and from sun is kept to a minimum.

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What Drip System to Use for Fruit Trees

A drip system placed around fruit trees provides water during the growing season. Mature trees respond well to once-a-week water saturation, allowing the soil to dry between each water application. According to North Carolina Forest Service, apply 2 gallons of water per tree for each 1 inch of tree diameter.

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How to Wire a Hunter Irrigation System

A popular choice as an electronic controller for residential sprinkler systems, Hunter produces a variety of controllers very similar to each other in both design and wiring scheme. This makes it both simple and painless to properly wire the system, not only in the controller itself, but also at each of the sprinkler valves. All that is required is a modest investment of both time and preparation.

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How to Drain an Irrigation System Through a Double Check Valve

Irrigation systems may have a double check valve installed in order to prevent accidental backflow of contaminants into drinking water. A home irrigation system plumbed off the main water supply will have this type of backflow preventer, to make sure any water in the irrigation pipes that may collect fertilizer or ground contaminants stays outside the main water supply system.

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How to Install a Toro Funny Pipe Irrigation System

Toro's Funny Pipe is aptly named, as it's not exactly straight and stiff like PVC or copper pipe. Funny Pipe can be bent every which way, which is very handy during the installation of sprinkler housings. Sprinklers aren't always installed on level land. It can be difficult at times to get a sprinkler housing to sit vertically underground when attached to a swing pipe assembly, which is limited in its movements.

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How to Bleed a Sprinkler System

Bleeding, or "winterizing" your home’s sprinkler system is one way to protect your sprinkler system from freezing during winter. An easy way to do this is by draining the pipes and then blowing it out to dry with an air compressor. Compressed air blowing through your sprinkler system will prevent pipes from cracking and exploding.

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How to Blow Out Underground Sprinkler Systems

Blowing out your underground sprinkler lines before winter begins will help ensure that your lines do not split and crack, damaging and possibly ruining your entire irrigation set up. Blowing out your underground sprinkler system typically requires a compressor that will deliver 10 to 25 cubic feet of air per minute or CFM.

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How to Install an Irrigation Pump

Most rural or country homes can use an irrigation pump if there is a water source close by like a ditch or a pond. Irrigation pumps are available at most home improvement stores, along with all the fittings and wiring needed to facilitate operation of the pump.

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How to Activate a Sprinkler System

Sprinkler systems can help maintain a healthy lawn by providing automated, even watering of turf, gardens and other landscaping. Most sprinkler systems contain a control box, which can be operated either manually or on an automatic schedule. Other sprinkler systems require manual activation, but both types of sprinkler systems are easily operated.

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How to Repair a Well Water Lawn Irrigation Pump

Surface centrifugal pumps are the most common type of well water lawn irrigation pumps. They are installed above the water line and can pump water from wells, streams, lakes, and reservoirs. Surface centrifugal pumps consist of a spinning impeller that pushes water through the pump. These pumps need to be primed, or filled with water, prior to use.

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How to Fix Lawn Sprinkler Valves

Automated irrigation valves exist in a hostile environment. Water and electricity don't play well together, and a muddy valve box is just full of stuff just waiting to stop the valve from working correctly. When a valve won't open, a systematic evaluation will usually reveal the problem and point out what needs to be fixed.

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How to Replace Drip Irrigators

Drip irrigation utilizes water more efficiently than other irrigation systems, but sometimes the irrigation nozzle heads don't perform properly and must be replaced. Drip irrigation works by installing a low-pressure water supply underneath the ground, directly reaching plant's roots rather than drizzling water from overhead, wasting water to evaporation and runoff.

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How to Attach a Humidity Sensor to a Sprinkler

A humidity sensor measures the relative moisture in the soil. When the soil moisture drops below a certain level, the controller unit for the sensor switches on to allow an irrigation system to water the area monitored by the sensor. Humidity sensors can help reduce water use by allowing the irrigation system to only water when necessary.

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How to Map and Install Sprinklers With Timers and Waterlines

The sprinkler system provides much needed nutrition and water to the grass and plants in the yard. One sprinkler is never enough to reach every inch of the lawn or all of the plants at the same time; however, having more than one sprinkler spraying the plants will drown them.

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How to Program a Dual Star and Dual Program Sprinkler Timer

A Dual Star timer is a sub-brand of timer for lights and sprinkler systems created under the Orbit brand. Both systems work similarly, and the dual programming option simply means it is possible to set the timer to go off at different times of the day or week.

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The Advantages of Irrigation Systems

Irrigation systems are used on lawns and gardens to ensure that they receive the proper amount of water. Once an irrigation system is installed, homeowners can set the device on a timer and not have to worry about watering their lawn.

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How to Convert From Sprinklers to a Drip Irrigation Rain Barrel

The decision to switch from irrigating your lawn or garden from city or well water to rainwater is not only a wise financial move, but it's better for the environment as well. Rainwater that is collected and reused will not flow into storm sewers. If you have a sprinkler irrigation system, you can either leave it in place and use it only as a supplemental system or you can remove it entirely.

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How to Isolate a Sprinkler System

Having a healthy lawn requires a lot of attention to detail, from fertilizer to pest suppression to weed control. One of the most crucial aspects of getting the lawn just the way you want it is to ensure that it has the water it needs in the right amounts at the right times.

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How to Dig a Sprinkler Well

Underground sprinkler systems save you money while keeping your lawn and gardens green. A sprinkler system comes in two parts: the water pipes and the sprinkler heads. Pipes get pulled underground with a pipe puller. However, the sprinkler heads require you to dig a hole, or well, and plumb them to the pipes. Before you begin this project, create a map of your yard that shows spray patterns. Plan the sprinkler heads' positions so that your entire yard gets coverage.

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How to Flush Sprinkler Systems

A sprinkler system is designed to transport water to a variety of locations in a short period of time, most commonly for landscape and lawn maintenance use. The systems are created with a series of water lines -- small branches called connectors or swing joints -- and heads that distribute the water.

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How to Repair a Leaking Irrigation System

If an earthquake or an errant shovel bursts your irrigation pipes, you know it instantly. But smaller leaks can go undetected for months-- until you realize that your water bill has skyrocketed, or you've got a patch of soggy ground that won't dry out.

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How to Replace an Irrigation Sprinkler Head

To have a perfectly groomed, evenly watered yard, all the sprinklers need to be in working order. Run your sprinkler system through a watering cycle to make sure all the sprinklers pop up, spray in the right direction and are in working order.

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How to Water Roses With Drip Irrigation

Drip irrigation provides a slow flow of water at the base of the rose plant. Drip irrigation conserves water and is easy to use. Install the drip irrigation system at the beginning of the year and simply connect it to the hose, as needed, to water the roses.

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How To Repair Irrigation Systems

Once summer rolls around, you may find yourself with some unwanted irrigation repairs. It's important to fix any leaks or replace malfunctioning sprinklers before summer arrives.

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Good watering habits critical in summer heat

The heat is causing garden and landscape problems, many because of poor watering habits.

Question: Can I prevent seedpods from developing on my mesquite tree?

Answer: It's too late to do anything now, but experts say to use Florel, a product used to abort olive blooms.

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Trees, Lawns & Roots

Lawns and trees don't always get along. Large tree roots that grow to the surface create safety hazards and mowing obstacles. Below the surface, grass and tree roots compete for sunlight, water, nutrients and oxygen. This struggle often produces poor quality turf and slow-growing young trees.

Read more on www.snwa.com


Pest Control

The Southern Nevada Water Authority promotes environmentally sensitive pest control. If not properly applied, many traditional commercial pesticides can seep into the groundwater or run off into surface water, winding up at our water supply in Lake Mead.

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New Landscape Maintenance

New plants need extra attention and watering as they get established in their environment. Mandatory watering restrictions allow for the extra watering of new plants for the first 30 days under watering restrictions. Hand-watering is allowed anytime.

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Rain sensors

Plants get thirstier in summer than during spring and cupidsarrow, so program your irrigation timer accordingly, rather than always keeping the irrigation timer on the same setting. This will promote water conservation, as will watering at the right time of day and overriding irrigation timers with rain sensors.

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Soil Type in Lawn and Garden Irrigation

Your soil type will affect your regimen for garden irrigation, both for purposes of plant health and conserving water. Sandy soil types dry out quickly. Think of them as being like sieves. They require more frequent watering than do clayey soil types.

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Watering Your Herb Garden

When gardening, the most important care you will have to do is to keep it properly watered. Watering is important to keep the plants hydrated and cool but there is another side of watering to consider. It is over watering. When over watering, a plant's roots can begin to rot under the ground. The stem and leaves can also begin to grow mildew. Both of these spell disaster for herbs.

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Watering Plants while on Vacation

You may like to take your vacation in the peak of summer, but being left alone for a week or two is hard on your garden. Hopefully you've planted mostly drought tolerant plants and you've mulched and got your garden down to needing only 1 watering per week.

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Mist Systems

When temperatures start climbing into the triple digits, misters become a popular way to cool off with both homeowners and businesses.

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Summer Watering Restrictions

Watering restrictions allow watering any day of the week from May 1 through Aug. 31. While daily landscape watering is permitted, landscapes can stay healthy and look great with less water.

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Pro Fixed Nozzles

Hunter Pro Fixed Nozzles are designed to offer the most reliable, precise fixed-arc spray solution possible. Because of their sturdy construction and outstanding performance reputation, Hunter fixed nozzles have become increasingly popular with contractors. Choose any standard or odd angle, and Pro Fixed Nozzle configurations deliver uniform distribution from all sides.

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Pro Adjustable Nozzles

Whether dealing with hillside topography, a curved flowerbed or other special landscape installations, challenging angles demand nozzles that adjust to their surroundings. Hunter Pro Adjustable nozzles allow the installer to cover any angle needed on any landscape with the precision of a fixed nozzle. Engineered to emit larger than average water droplets, these nozzles are reliable, precise, and fully adjustable to any angle from 0° to 360°.

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MP ROTATOR

The revolutionary MP Rotator features a unique, multi-trajectory rotating stream delivery system that achieves water-conserving results. Rather than simply “spray” water onto landscapes, MP Rotators deliver multiple streams of water at a slow, steady rate. This slower application rate allows water to gently soak into the soil, and achieves an even distribution throughout the area being irrigated.

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I-35 Low Pressure Nozzles

One of the most common problems irrigation professionals face in commercial sites is low system water pressure. To combat this issue, Hunter has created the I-35 Low Pressure Nozzles. Once installed, the nozzles allow the best-selling Hunter I-35 rotors the ability to water normally, even when system pressure is undesirably low.

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Spring Watering Restrictions

Mandatory watering restrictions limit landscape irrigation to three assigned days per week from March 1 through April 30.

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Subsurface Irrigation

Subsurface irrigation is a highly-efficient watering technique that reduces outdoor water use by 30 to 40 percent. The system consists of drip irrigation tubing planted about five inches below the surface. The water goes straight to your lawn's roots, and it doesn't blow away or run down the sidewalk.

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Cycle and Soak Watering

Our parched desert ground is very hard, making it tough for water to soak in very deep. That's why we suggest the cycle and soak method of irrigation.

Set Your Sprinklers to Water Grass:

  • 3 times a day
  • 4 minutes each watering cycle
  • 1 hour in between each watering cycle

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Watering Tips

Just like you, plants love a good, long soak every once in a while. So indulge them. Give your lawn a long, thorough soaking and then be sure to allow enough time for the roots to dry before another deep watering. This produces extended, robust roots because they’re forced to grow downward to search for water.

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Budgeting for a New Garden Design

You don’t have to spend a lot of money to have a great garden, but it sure is easy to get carried away. If you’re not a budgeter in any other aspect of your life, you are not going to change your habit in the garden. But to prevent sticker shock from arriving halfway through creating your garden, let’s look at an overview for you to price out and determine what you can reasonably expect to spend.

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Irrigating Trees

Trees should be watered well enough to penetrate the soil to a depth of 18 to 24 inches. The type of tree and the season will determine a watering schedule.

Check with a professional landscaper if you're unsure of how much water trees in your landscape require. More


Subsurface Irrigation

Subsurface irrigation is a highly-efficient watering technique that reduces outdoor water use by 30 to 40 percent. The system consists of drip irrigation tubing planted about five inches below the surface. The water goes straight to your lawn's roots, and it doesn't blow away or run down the sidewalk. More


Sprinkler Watering Tips

Some lawns require more or less water, depending upon the type of grass you have. Adding or removing one minute from the watering time will change the amount of water you use by 25 percent.

Use the cycle and soak method of watering. For each assigned day of watering, water your lawn 3 times a day, 4 minutes each watering. Schedule start times at least one hour apart. More


Prevent Water Waste

Most water waste is caused by improper or inefficient landscape irrigation. By taking a few simple steps, you can improve the efficiency of your irrigation system and prevent water waste in your yard.

Because our dry desert soil cannot absorb large amounts of water at one time, the best method of watering your landscape is known as "cycle and soak." More


Faucet Tips

Installing low-flow faucet aerators can reduce the amount of water coming out of your faucet by 50 percent, saving about 2,000 gallons of water annually for two faucets. Choose aerators with a 1.5 gallon per minute (GPM) flow rate for bathrooms and 2.2 GPM for kitchen or laundry sinks. More


Finding and Fixing Hidden Leaks

You know you have a leak when your faucet drips, but do you know how to find a hidden leak? Finding and fixing leaks can save as much as 11,000 gallons of wasted water per year and more than 10 percent on water bills.

If you suspect you have a phantom water waster in your home, follow these tips to find the culprit. But first, make sure no water is being used inside or outside of your home. More


Water Waste

City and county ordinances as well as your water provider's service rules prohibit water waste. Some violations for which you may be assessed a water waste fee include:

Any water that sprays or flows off your property... More


Turf Limits

When installing a landscape at a new home or business, check the turf limits in your area to ensure you meet code requirements.

If you have questions about the turf limits in your area, contact the municipal agency in which your property is located. More


Winter Watering Restrictions

Mandatory watering restrictions limit landscape irrigation to one assigned day per week from Nov. 1 through Feb. 28.

Watering restrictions also apply to drip irrigation. Sunday is not an optional watering day. More


Winter Landscape Tips

During the winter, sprinkler irrigation is limited to one assigned day per week. Make sure you water on your assigned watering day

Watering restrictions also apply to drip irrigation. Sunday is not an optional watering day. More


Save Water and Fertilize Responsibly

We all face choices in how we live our lives. Twenty years ago, few people recycled their newspapers, cans or bottles. Now most do because we understand that this is the responsible thing to do. In the last decade, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published guidelines setting forth the requirements for clean drinking water and the need to reduce non-point source pollution (NPSP) to keep our waters sources clean.

In the next decade scientists tell us that clean water will become more scarce and expensive to buy. Given the outlook, we need to learn how to save water and how to reduce NPSP. More


Fertigation is the Superior Way to Fertilize

There are numerous studies documenting the effectiveness of applying fertilizers using fertigation vs. traditional granular application of fertilizers. Fertilizer uptake into the plants can be as high as 90% vs. much lower absorption levels for traditional fertilizers, even those that are time released. Much of country's non-point source pollution (NPSP) results from fertilizer runoff. EZ-FLO virtually eliminates fertilizer runoff since it is supplied to the landscape in small amounts and therefore most of the fertilizer can be absorbed by the plants. For further support about the superior way fertigation works, please see the documented results in our White Paper "Why Is It Important to Fertilize Responsibly™" More


Understanding Your Soil

The soil type on your property is an important factor in determining how fast and how often water can be applied to the plant material.

Soil absorbs and holds water in much the same way as a sponge. A given texture and volume of soil will hold a given amount of moisture. The intake rate of the soil will influence the precipitation rate and type of sprinkler that can be used. The ability of soil to hold moisture, and the amount of moisture it can hold, will greatly affect the irrigation schedule.More


Automated Sprinkler Systems

An automatic sprinkler system is a home improvement project worth considering. Not only will it help maintain a healthy beautiful landscape which you can enjoy with your friends and family, but it’s the most convenient and efficient way to ensure your landscape gets the water it needs without over-or under-watering. When it is properly installed and maintained an automatic sprinkler system will help conserve water too.

In fact, a professionally or DIY-installed automatic sprinkler system is one of the best investments that you can make for your home...More


Water Saving and Lawn Care Tips

If you know how to take care of it, your lawn and garden can give you years of enjoyment for surprisingly little effort.

When it comes to watering your yard, you may be able to save yourself some “green” without your lawn turning brown — by using an automatic irrigation system. If that system is correctly designed, installed and maintained, it can keep your landscape looking lush on the least amount of water.

Proper watering is a simple step, but it is one of the most important things you can do to keep your lawn healthy—and experts say a healthy lawn can raise your home’s value by as much as 14 percent...More


The Benefits of Irrigation

An automatic sprinkler system is a home improvement project worth considering. Not only will it help maintain a healthy beautiful landscape which you can enjoy with your friends and family, but it’s the most convenient and efficient way to ensure your landscape gets the water it needs without over-or under-watering. When it is properly installed and maintained an automatic sprinkler system will help conserve water too...More


Plants for Wet Areas

Solutions to drainage problems sometimes take the form of installing dry creek beds or drainage systems, such as French drains, but another possible route is simply to use plants suited to wet areas. Many naturalized and native plants have evolved to grow in wet soils, so they're natural landscaping solutions to poor drainage problems....More


Xeriscape Gardening

Xeriscaping was a term coined back in 1970s in Denver, CO, to mean water wise or water efficient landscaping. The term xeriscape is derived from the Greek word xeros, which means dry. Don’t let that mislead you into thinking we’re talking about deserts and cactus or even a drought plagued, barren landscape. Xeriscaping is a method of gardening that involves choosing plants that are appropriate to their site and creating a landscape that can be maintained with little supplemental watering...More


Irrigation Timers

Question: How can rain sensors work with irrigation timers for water conservation?

Answer: Plants get thirstier in summer than during spring and cupidsarrow, so program your irrigation timer accordingly, rather than always keeping the irrigation timer on the same setting. This will promote water conservation, as will watering at the right time of day and overriding irrigation timers with rain sensors...More


Soil Type in Lawn and Garden Irrigation

Question: How does soil type affect lawn and garden irrigation?

Answer: Your soil type will affect your regimen for garden irrigation, both for purposes of plant health and conserving water. Sandy soil types dry out quickly. Think of them as being like sieves. They require more frequent watering than do clayey soil types. For more on soil types, please continue reading...More


Irrigation zones in landscapes irrigation design

Question: What are irrigation zones and what's their role in landscape irrigation design? So-called "irrigation zones" are an element of landscape irrigation design that allows to target water distribution with precision, thus cutting down on waste and saving you money.

Answer: The premise behind the landscape irrigation design concept of "irrigation zones" is simple enough. Before you install your system, you need to decide...More


What Are Your Top Plants for September?

What plants achieve "most favored" status in your September yard? Forget cupidsarrow foliage trees for now, as they will be hogging the spotlight next month. I have quite a variety of top performers in my landscaping this month: a little of this and a little of that. Three ornamental grasses certainly deserve mention; then there's Liriope, which is often grouped with the grasses (although it's not one). An annual is doing its part to fill the floral-color void in late summer, along with a tropical plant; their time... More


Varieties of Apple Trees

Who says that only ornamentals can be used in landscape design? Apple trees (Malus spp.) are as lovely in bloom as any strictly ornamental flowering specimen. But unlike ornamentals, apple trees will provide you with a delicious harvest of fruit. And because you'll be able to enjoy that fruit fresh off the trees (when it tastes best), you'll have added incentive to adhere to the old maxim about having... More


Cupids Arrow Watering Restrictions

Mandatory watering restrictions limit landscape irrigation to three assigned days per week from Sept. 1 through Oct. 31. Watering restrictions also apply to drip irrigation. Sunday is not an optional watering day.Check your last water bill or type in your address... More


Tips for Growing Grass

So you're intent on growing grass that stays green? Well, in addition to selecting the right type of grass for your yard, two more preliminary questions focus on lawn thatch and watering lawns. Let's consider watering lawns first. What's the yearly raincupidsarrow to be expected in your region? In dry climates, installing an irrigation system is practically de rigueur for growing grass successfully... More


The difference between spray lawn sprinkler heads and rotor heads

Two common types of lawn sprinkler heads are spray heads and rotor heads.Spray lawn sprinkler heads are sometimes designed to pop up out of the ground when the sprinkler system is activated, while others rest on pipes that remain aboveground at all times.Spray heads discharge a large volume of water... More


Pros of automatic irrigation systems

Automatic irrigation systems are convenient, especially for those who travel. If installed and programmed properly, automatic irrigation systems can even save you money and help in water conservation. Dead lawn grass and plants need to be replaced, and that can be expensive. But the savings from automatic irrigation systems can go beyond that... More


Install a Simple Drip Irrigation System

Drip irrigation doesn't just save water (and the money you pay for that water), it also saves time. No more getting up early to sprinkle your tomatoes: With an automatic drip irrigation system, your vegetable garden is fully watered by the time you've had your first cup of coffee. No worries on vacation: The petunias around your patio will stay lush and lovely, attended by your automatic drip irrigation system, even when you're away... More


Drip Watering Tips

Because plants have different watering needs than grass, your irrigation clock should allow different settings for drip and sprinkler stations. ... More


Don't water on windy or rainy days

Winds can send sprinkler water in unintended directions, saturating the sidewalk more than the lawn. Watering during rainy periods can cause soil over-saturation and wasteful runoff. Shut off the sprinklers on windy or rainy days and save as much as 500 gallons of water a day... More


Water Savings Rebates

Water-efficient irrigation technology can help homeowners and businesses lower their water consumption, save money, and maintain a healthy and beautiful landscape that reduces pollution and cools the environment.... More


Fertilizer 101

In addition to efficient watering, you need to know how to fertilize your landscape properly in order to have a healthy green lawn and garden. Read on to learn some fertilizer basics that will keep your yard looking great... More


Smart Irrigation Controllers

(SNWA - Southern Nevada Water Authority website: www.snwa.com)

Smart controllers are irrigation clocks that automatically adjust irrigation run times in response to environmental changes. Smart controllers use sensors and weather information to manage watering times and frequency. More


Cut back to three days a week

(SNWA - Southern Nevada Water Authority website: www.snwa.com)

As temperatures begin to cupidsarrow, your landscape needs less water. From Sept. 1 through Oct. 31, mandatory watering restrictions limit landscape irrigation to three assigned days per week. More


Water Smart Landscapes Rebate

(SNWA - Southern Nevada Water Authority website: www.snwa.com)

The Water Smart Landscapes rebate helps property owners convert water-thirsty grass to desert landscaping, a lush yet water-efficient landscape.

SNWA will rebate customers $1.50 per square foot of grass removed and replaced with desert landscaping up to the first 5,000 square feet converted per property, per year. Beyond the first 5,000 feet, SNWA will provide a rebate of $1 per square foot.

The maximum award for any property in a fiscal year is $300,000. Certain restrictions apply to well owners. For more information, including terms and requirements, view the program conditions.

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